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The group, Ansaru, said the foreigners, who were kidnapped from a construction company’s compound in February, were killed

to prevent rescue attempts.
About half of all

Americans never seek a second opinion about a diagnosis, treatment, drug or operation, according to a 2005 Gallup poll. But if you want a second opinion, you needn't worry, says Orly Avitzur, medical adviser to Consumers Union. ¶ Physicians are bound by a code of ethics to coop...BEIRUT — The Syrian regime of President Bashar al-Assad warned Sunday that a series of powerful Israeli airstrikes near the Syrian capital opened the door to “all the options,” underscoring the possibility that Syria’s civil war could spill across regional borders.
Read full article >>     Daniel Sedin had a goal and an assist, and Cory Schneider made 32 saves in the Vancouver Canucks' 3-2 victory over

the St.
Louis Blues on

Tuesday night. Hopeful signs coming out of the Big Ten? A North Carolina-Kansas matchup? One thing is certain: Kentucky will not be

around to defend its title.
“I appreciate that much of

the responsibility, accountability, organizational skills, and work ethic that I took from the class resulted from his high expectations for

our performance and his confidence in our success.”
No reason to put the fear of God into your iPhone-loving kid. We can't comment on the brain rot, but a new study does show that children who use cell phones have no greater risk of getting brain cancer than kids who don't use them, Reuters reports.
Logan Couture and Joe Pavelski scored goals 30 seconds apart late in the third period to help the San Jose Sharks clinch their ninth straight playoff berth with a come-from-behind

3-2 victory over the Dallas Stars on Tuesday night.     I’m the

parent who chooses life

and a buzz cut over

endless hours with the fancy nit comb — even when the hair is my own.     Ralf Speth criticises government subsidy of 'poor electric vehicles' and nationwide charging stationsElectric cars will never be a mass-market solution to climate change and should not get government subsidies, the chief executive of Jaguar Land Rover said on Tuesday .The
British and other governments have introduced generous subsidies to encourage motorists to switch to emission-free electric cars.Ralf Speth said it was wrong to subsidise "poor electric vehicles" and nationwide charging stations. "At this time I am not a very big friend of electric vehicles," he said in an interview at the Geneva motor show."The
batteries are too expensive …the customer

must be very rich, and can only use [them] in

mega-cities [where there are charging points].
Should we do it only for the rich?"He said it would be better to wait until the technology improves and there is a greater benefit to the environment.Speth,
who has been chief executive of Indian-owned Jaguar Land Rover since 2010, said the market should decide if electric cars are the future. "The customer is clever enough to decide what he wants or doesn't

want," he said. "Even with lots of subsidy the demand is not very high."Jaguar
Land Rover has developed an electric version of the Defender 4x4, but Speth said it would cost "five digits" more to buy than the conventional version. The car unveiled at the motor show on

Tuesday will not be for sale.He said the carmaker would launch the world's first hybrid sports utility vehicle later this year.Speth's comments came as Nissan underlined its commitment to build up to 50,000 Leaf electric cars in Sunderland. Andy Palmer, Nissan executive vice-president and the most powerful Briton at the Japanese company, said northeast production of the Leaf would begin on 28 March.
He conceded that demand for electric cars has been hampered by the high price of the vehicles and "range anxiety" – people fear they may not be able to charge their cars if they go too far out of town.But he said moving manufacturing from Japan to Sunderland had allowed it to cut the price to £23,490 - truth about abs review more than a similar petrol model.
The £23,490 retail price comes after a £5,000 government subsidy.Palmer said range anxiety would reduce following the government's commitment to invest

£37m in paying 75% of the cost

of new charging points at garage forecourts, supermarkets and homes."The UK

is really leading the way in electric cars, and we would like to see other governments picking up on that," he said.He said takeup of electric cars had been most extensive in Norway, where there is no import tax on electric vehicles and the country already has an extensive network of charging points used to

prevent engines seizing

up in cold weather.
He said the Leaf is currently the 13th best-selling car in Norway.Automotive industryElectric, hybrid and low-emission carsCarbon emissionsTravel and transportMotoringMotoringJaguar Land RoverRupert Neateguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use

of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds The Supreme Court operates with almost no rules to guide - or constrain - behavior.
But why should it be subject to lesser ethics standards than lower courts? As recently as 5,000 years ago, the Sahara — today a vast desert in northern Africa, spanning more than 3.5
million square miles — was a verdant landscape, with sprawling vegetation and numerous lakes. Ancient cave paintings in the region depict hippos in watering holes, and roving herds of elephants and giraffes — a vibrant contrast with today’s barren, inhospitable terrain. The Sahara’s “green” era, known as the African Humid Period, likely lasted from 11,000 to 5,000 years ago, and is thought to have ended abruptly, with the region drying back into desert within a span of one to two centuries. Now researchers at MIT, Columbia University and elsewhere have found that this abrupt climate change occurred nearly simultaneously across North Africa. The team traced the region’s

wet and dry periods over the past 30,000 years by analyzing sediment samples off the coast of Africa. Such sediments are composed, in part, of dust

blown from the continent over thousands of years: The more dust that accumulated in a given period, the drier the continent may have been. From their measurements, the researchers found that the Sahara emitted five times less dust during the African Humid Period than the region does today. Their results, which suggest a far greater change in Africa’s climate than previously estimated, will be published in Earth and Planetary Science Letters.David
McGee, an assistant professor in MIT’s Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, says the quantitative results of the study will help scientists determine the influence of dust emissions on both past and present climate change. “Our results point to surprisingly large changes in how much dust is coming out of Africa,” says McGee, who did much of the work as a postdoc at Columbia.
“This gives us a baseline for looking further back in time, to interpret how big past climate swings were.
This [period] was the most recent climate swing in Africa. What was it like before?” Getting to the core of dustTo trace Africa’s dust emissions through time, McGee analyzed sediment samples collected in 2007 by researchers from Columbia and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
Researchers sampled from sites off the northwest coast of Africa, spanning a distance of more than 550 miles. At each site, they collected a core sample — a 10-foot long cylinder topped by

a weight — which scientists submerged, collecting a column of sediment. McGee says a 10-foot column represents approximately 30,000 years of sediments deposited, layer

by layer, in

the ocean — sediments

like windblown dust from the continent, marine deposits brought in by ocean currents, and leftover bits of organisms that sank to the seafloor.
A centimeter of sediment corresponds to about 100 years of deposition, providing what McGee calls a “high-resolution”

record of dust changes through time.To trace how much windblown dust accumulated over the past 30,000 years, McGee used a TradeMiner review techniques to first determine how fast sediments accumulated over time, then subtracted out the accumulation of marine sediments and biological remnants. Layer by layerUsing a technique called thorium-230 normalization, McGee and his colleagues calculated accumulation rates for sediment layers every two to three centimeters along the column. The technique is based on the decay of uranium in seawater: Over time, uranium decays to thorium-230, an insoluble chemical

that sticks to any falling sediment as it sinks to the seafloor. The amount of uranium — and by extension, the production rate of thorium-230 — in the world’s oceans is relatively constant. McGee measured the concentration of thorium-230 in each core sample to determine the accumulation rates of sediments through time.
In periods when sediments accumulated quickly, there was a smaller concentration of thorium-230. In slower-accumulating periods, McGee

measured a greater thorium-230 concentration. Once the team calculated rates of sediment accumulation over the past 30,000 years, it went about determining how much of that sediment was dust from neighboring Africa. The researchers subtracted biological sediment from the samples by measuring calcium carbonate, opal and organic carbon, the primary remnants of living organisms. After subtracting this measurement from each sample layer, the researchers tackled the task of separating the remaining sediment into windblown dust and marine sediments — particles that circulate through the ocean, deposited on the seafloor by currents. McGee employed a second technique called grain-size endmember modeling, charting a distribution of grain sizes ranging from coarse grains of dust to

fine grains of marine soil.
“We define these endmembers: A pure dust signal would look like this, and a pure marine sediment would look like this,” McGee says. “And then we see, OK, what combination of those extremes would give us this mixture that we see here?” This study, McGee says, is the first in which researchers have combined the two techniques — endmember modeling and thorium-230 normalization — a pairing that produced very precise measurements of dust emissions through tens of thousands of years.In the end, the team found that during some dry periods North Africa emitted more than twice the dust generated today.
Through their samples, the researchers found the African Humid Period began and ended very abruptly, consistent with previous findings.
However, they found that 6,000 years ago, toward the end of this period, dust emissions were one-fifth today’s levels, and far less dusty than previous estimates.
McGee says these new measurements may give scientists a better understanding of how dust fluxes relate to climate by providing inputs for climate models.
Natalie Mahowald, a professor of earth and atmospheric sciences at Cornell University, says the group’s combination of techniques yielded more robust estimates of dust than previous studies. “Dust is one of the most important aerosols for climate and biogeochemistry,” Mahowald says.
“This study suggests very large fluctuations due to climate over the last 10,000 years, which has enormous implications for human-derived climate change.”As a next step, McGee is working with collaborators to test whether these new measurements may help to resolve a longstanding problem: the inability of climate models to reproduce the magnitude of wet conditions in North Africa 6,000 years ago. By using these new results to estimate the climate impacts of dust emissions on regional climate, models may finally be able to replicate the North Africa of 6,000 years ago — a region of grasslands that were host to a variety of roaming wildlife.“This is a period that captures people’s imaginations,” McGee says. “It’s important to understand whether and how much dust has had an impact on past climate.”This
research was funded by the

National Science Foundation and by a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration postdoctoral fellowship to McGee. The spring exhibition at Wave Hill features seven contemporary artists who explore their fascination with and connection to the natural world.     With caffeine now being added to jelly beans, waffles, even potato chips and gum, the Food and Drug Administration is stepping up efforts to investigate the impact on
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